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The Struggle for a Free Stage in London Watson Nicholson

The Struggle for a Free Stage in London

Watson Nicholson

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230246291
Paperback
82 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... THE STRUGGLE FOR A FREEMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... THE STRUGGLE FOR A FREE STAGE IN LONDON CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF THEATRICAL MONOPOLY DURING THE FIRST HALF CENTURY OF THE PATENT THEATRES OF all the follies committed by Charles II, after his restoration to the throne of his father, of glorious memory, none seemed more innocent than the creation of the monopoly over the acted, national drama in London and Westminster. And none, probably, was of more far-reaching consequences, either as to the difficulties involved, or the duration of the controversies arising out of the simple, irresponsible act of the King, when, on August 21, 1660, he granted his letters patent to Thomas Killigrew and Sir William Davenant, making them the sole guardians of theatrical amusements in the metropolis. For the monopoly thus created lasted until near the middle of the nineteenth century- and the train of strifes which it entailed gathered in size and momentum to the end of the long struggle waged against it. The causes alleged by King Charles for this particular act form not only a humorous commentary in themselves, -- when we recall the character of the brilliant dramas written for the delectation of the Merrie Monarch and his Court, -- but they also, inadvertently as it were, contain the fulcrum on which, later, the opponents to the monopoly operated to oust all patent rights connected with the London theatres. In the preamble to the grant to Killigrew and Davenant appears the ostensible raison detre of the theatrical monopoly created by Charles. Whereas wee are given to understand, so runs the document, that certain persons in and about our City of London, or the suburbs thereof, doe frequently assemble for the performing and acting of Playes and Enterludes for reeva