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Brain and Crainal Nerves Volume 2 William Richard Gowers

Brain and Crainal Nerves Volume 2

William Richard Gowers

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230221427
Paperback
514 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...it. But such a murmurMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...it. But such a murmur has only been heard in a few cases of aneurism of the internal carotid or vertebral arteries. The distinction may, however, be made with probability when the symptoms of a tumour, in the position of a vessel, develop in connection with one of the causes of aneurism, especially heart disease. Syphilis and injury have less diagnostic significance, because each (and syphilis especially) is a cause of growth more frequently than of aneurism, but this significance varies according to the seat of the disease. In the cavernous sinus, for instance, an aneurism is far more probable than a growth. Moreover, in cases of syphilis, the fact that treatment fails to exert an influence on the tumour is often strong evidence of its aneurisms! nature. Whatever be the apparent cause, it is of great importance to recog. nise the correspondence in the position of the tumour with that of one of the arteries liable to be thus affected, and to remember the special relation of some causes to certain arteries, as already described, as embolism to the middle cerebral and syphilis to the basilar. The evidence of the existence and seat of an aneurism have thus to be frequently considered together, but the latter is not often unequivocal. The seat of pain is of significance only when it is occipital (basilar artery). Loss of sight in one eye, sometimes extending to the other--with, or especially without, optic neuritis- with or with A case in which this occurred in an aneurism of the internal carotid has been recorded by.Mr. Hutch.neon (Clin. Soc. Tran., 1875). out loss of smell on the side first affected, --occurs in aneurism of the internal carotid or anterior cerebral- and the distinction between the two depends on the presence or.